Tag Archives: Malorie Blackman

Noble Conflict by Malorie Blackman

Malorie Blackman is best known for her award-winning Noughts and Crosses series set in a society where the role of black and white people are reversed. It a powerful story loosely based on Romeo and Juliet about the love between Sephy ( a member of the dark-skinned ruling class) and Callum ( a ‘colourless’ member of the underclass) set against a racist backdrop. Even though it was first written in 2001 it still captivates readers today as you can tell by this review by Dina posted on August 30th, 2013 on Malorie Blackman’s official website:

“This is an amazing book, it has to be the best book I have ever read! It is so deep and moving I never knew a book can make me cry so much, it sticks with you, it has changed my view about life and relationships. This story will always be close to my heart. I recommend everyone to read it!”

This is an amazing book, it has to be the best book i have ever read ! it is so deep and moving i never knew a book can make me cry so much, it sticks with you, it has changed my view about life and relationships. This story will always be close to my heart. I recommend everyone to read it ! – See more at: http://www.malorieblackman.co.uk/index.php/noughts-and-crosses-2/#comments
This is an amazing book, it has to be the best book i have ever read ! it is so deep and moving i never knew a book can make me cry so much, it sticks with you, it has changed my view about life and relationships. This story will always be close to my heart. I recommend everyone to read it ! – See more at: http://www.malorieblackman.co.uk/index.php/noughts-and-crosses-2/#comments
This is an amazing book, it has to be the best book i have ever read ! it is so deep and moving i never knew a book can make me cry so much, it sticks with you, it has changed my view about life and relationships. This story will always be close to my heart. I recommend everyone to read it ! – See more at: http://www.malorieblackman.co.uk/index.php/noughts-and-crosses-2/#comments

So the latest novel Noble Conflict, has a lot to live up to but …  it does not disappoint. This is another exciting story that has you rushing to read the next page. In Noble Conflict Malorie Blackman revisits the theme of the assumptions that majorities make about minorities. This is a novel about how there are always two sides to every conflict and a reminder that blind obedience does not necessarily result in a healthy society; asking questions, checking facts, and making no assumptions is a good thing.  I also enjoyed the fact that one of the characters, Mac, was a Librarian with purple hair and that she played a valuable role in helping Kasper search for the truth using cool, semi-intelligent databots in cyberspace.
Noble Conflict also reminded me a little of The Bridge by Jane Higgins which is another very well written book about distrust and war based on misinformation.

Mrs H.

Some Malorie Blackman trivia. Did you know that she is mentioned in the lyrics of “Written in the Stars” by Tinie Tempah?

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Boys Don’t Cry by Malorie Blackman

If you lost yourself in the world of Noughts and Crosses you will certainly enjoy entering the masculine world of Dante Leon Bridgeman, his father and his brother. For this is an honest account of what it might be like to discover that you a teenage father. Malorie Blackman enjoys turning the usual and accepted viewpoint on its head. In Noughts and Crosses she inverted the historic positions of black and white people living in Britain, and in Boys Don’t Cry we find out what it is like for a young man to be “left holding the baby” rather than the young girl.
This book is not only about Dante’s hopes and dreams for his future, it is also about identity and what defines a man. Although I enjoyed the journey with Dante I equally enjoyed the plot surrounding Dante’s confident brother, Adam.

Malorie Blackman reads an excerpt from her book Boys Don’t Cry, and reveals why she chose to write it from the point of view of a teenage boy. Click here.

You’re waiting for the postman — he’s bringing your A level results. University, a career as a journalist — a glittering future lies ahead. But when the doorbell rings it’s your old girlfriend; and she’s carrying a baby.

Some books about teenage pregnancy from the point of view of girls that you may find at the public library:

Butterflies in May by Karen Hart
Roxy’s Baby by Catherine MacPhail
Jumping off Swings by Jo Knowles